Helping America Navigate a New Energy Reality

$20 Oil No Longer Seen As Good For The Economy

By on 18 Jan 2016 in news, notable posts

(OilPrice.com) After flirting with breaking below $30 per barrel, oil decidedly broke that threshold at the end of last week, deepening the unrelenting losses the market shave witnessed so far in 2016.

The reasons for the 20 percent decline in oil prices since the start of the year range from rapidly growing concerns over the Chinese economy , fears of a persistent glut in oil supplies, and most recently the removal of sanctions on Iran . Iran has vowed to bring back 500,000 to 1 million barrels per day (mb/d) in oil within a year. In fact, the Iranian oil ministry issued an order to increase production by 500,000 barrels per day immediately after sanctions were removed.

The gains in Iranian output could be frontloaded, since anything more than the 500,000 to 1 mb/d in increases will require significant investment and may take years to come to fruition.

Still, the near-term effect is negative for oil prices. Even though oil markets have largely baked in the effect of Iran bringing oil back online into the price for crude, there was a bit of a knee-jerk reaction to the news that sanctions were lifted. Also, Iran has oil and condensates sitting in floating storage in the Persian Gulf, inventories that will now be able to be sold off. Estimates vary, but Iran is believed to be sitting on 18 tankers full of 12 million barrels of crude oil plus 24 million barrels of condensates. As those volumes are sold into an oversupplied market, prices could suffer from further downward pressure.

The pessimism continues to weigh on the price for crude. Hedge funds pushed their net-short positions on the price of oil to record highs, an indication that oil speculators believe that oil prices will continue to decline. According to data from the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, net-short positions jumped by 15 percent to 200,975 futures contracts for the week ending on January 12, an all-time high. Similarly, net-long positions fell to five-year lows.

“There are a lot of people who thought oil can’t go down much further and tried to call a bottom,” said Michael Corcelli, chief investment officer of Miami-based hedge fund Alexander Alternative Capital LLC, told Bloomberg in a January 17 interview. “When we have monster pullbacks, things don’t end politely. I think we’ll drop to $24 or $25 and then have a sharp V-shaped rally.”

Read full post at oilprice.com

Comments are closed.

Top